PDA

View Full Version : Networking questions



mikehende
08-08-2006, 11:01 AM
Ok guys, I am up to Networking now in MM's Book, first question regards Cat5e vs Cat6 cables, I have the CAT5E cables in our NETWORK, would replacing those with cat6 improve the performance of our networking? I don't think it will but I have to ask to be sure.

Tortanick
08-08-2006, 12:11 PM
Try sending a large file from two computers, if it reaches speeds near your ethernet card's then keep the Cat5e cables. If not ask again ;)

mikehende
08-08-2006, 12:49 PM
I guess I should have asked this question first, which single unit determines the speed of a network? Router, NIC card, cable e.t.c?

Tortanick
08-08-2006, 01:25 PM
The slowest :)

Or did you mean bits per second? its allways megabits, or gigabits, never bytes

Dan18960
08-08-2006, 02:30 PM
I guess I should have asked this question first, which single unit determines the speed of a network? Router, NIC card, cable e.t.c?

Actually ALL of the above!

If the Network is saturated with a large database - it can reflect a slowness, if the NIC is rated at 10/100 and set to half duplex vs full duplex - it will reflect a slowness, if the cable is near the extent of 100 meters - it will refect a slowness, if the router can't negotiate a managed 100/n(number of computers) connections - it can refect a slowness, a HUB vs a SWITCH will refect a slowness.

When scoping a network you have to take into consideration the purpose, the usage, and the future demands. For example, if you have a client that is going to be doing a lot of graphic work on your LAN - you would want to have a managed switch to allocate that user to have 100 mbps and share off a slower port to a secretary that is only going to be doing email / internet / documents and printing. Since the internet doesn't have a consistent speed of anywhere near 100 mbps (TODAY), setting the secretary up for 100 mbps allocation would just be a useless configuration of throughput.

You also have to pair off ROI - while it might be nice to sell a client a 1g switch - their possibility of using that before they "needed" it would not have a return on their investment. Remember the internet is what everyone guages their "production" at and 1g is not going to make an internet access any faster. So installing a managed 100 mbps switch would be "reasonable" and by the time the client would be excelerating to the 1g LAN - the price would have come down substantially.

mikehende
08-08-2006, 02:37 PM
If I understand you correctly Dan, then this is what I am thinking too, meaning, why pay the super high prices for the networking stuff that boast top specs if they won't make your Networking any faster? Sort of like buying a very expensive 200mph top speed sports car and can never drive over 60mph?

Dan18960
08-08-2006, 06:48 PM
Yep - sometimes you have to WAIT on technology. It comes down to needs vs wants.

Just because someone wants a fast network doesn't mean they are going to see the realized speed of spending all that money.

We were running most of our networks at 10mbps even though 100 mbps was being released. The clients were still using DOS based applications and would NEVER have seen any difference in 10 vs 100 mbps. When they made the migration to Windows apps - we moved them to 100 mbps and the price was reasonable.

You don't always have to have the fastest machine to type :cool:

mikehende
08-08-2006, 06:59 PM
From what I understand, you're only as fast as your DSL/Cable's speed which is a measly 15-20mbps so getting equipment with the highest rating does absolutely nothing to improve speed, if this is correct then to answer my original question, changing from my existing CAT5E cables to Cat6 will NOT improve the speed of my network, am I correct? If so, is there any reason at all why I should consider upgrading any of my Networking peripherals?

TonyDi
08-08-2006, 09:32 PM
You're limited by your DSL/Cable speed in only your access to the Internet. That doesn't limit the speed between machines connected to your network. You you may be able to transfer files between your computers with lightning speed, regardless of your Internet connect speed.

So your internal speed can be faster than your external speed.
-td

mikehende
08-08-2006, 09:53 PM
So your internal speed can be faster than your external speed.
-td

A reason where upgrading peripherals may come in handy, thanks.

Dan18960
08-09-2006, 09:27 AM
Mike,

What are you referring to in "peripherals"? The ONLY speed that will be noticed is from computer to computer/server. Your printing will NOT benefit from 1g at this time as they are mostly still in the concept of computer connectivity which doesn't communicate anywhere near 1g (barely at the 10mbps if that).

And basically it is on the processor/fsb that accepts data from the network.

For example, I am sitting at my office system that is an "ancient" system running 1.7mhz and when I access the internet or emails the speed is acceptable (I work on this dinosaur 80% of the time) and my document access is straight throughput of 100mbps. BUT on my system in my study that is a Dual Core 930 3.0ghz/SATA 10k hard drive/667mhz 1g RAM connected to a 10MBPS link the internet is faster, docs are faster, and graphics are better even though I am only using 1/10th of the mbps of the 1.7 machine.

Again, analyzing your network will relate to more than just having the latest and greatest technology in place.

mikehende
08-09-2006, 09:50 AM
Mike,
What are you referring to in "peripherals"? The ONLY speed that will be noticed is from computer to computer/server.

NIC card, cable, router and yes, I am aware that the speed will only be improved fom pc to pc/server.


For example, I am sitting at my office system that is an "ancient" system running 1.7mhz and when I access the internet or emails the speed is acceptable (I work on this dinosaur 80% of the time) and my document access is straight throughput of 100mbps. BUT on my system in my study that is a Dual Core 930 3.0ghz/SATA 10k hard drive/667mhz 1g RAM connected to a 10MBPS link the internet is faster, docs are faster, and graphics are better even though I am only using 1/10th of the mbps of the 1.7 machine.

To what exactly do you attribute your better machine getting faster results Dan?

dbarrow
08-09-2006, 11:33 AM
Network is as fast as the slowest choke point in it...
If router is 10/100, your 10/1000 nic cards can only go as fast as the router.

Dan18960
08-09-2006, 01:39 PM
Mike,

It was in the stats of the system - the Dual Core is capable of handling instructions sets faster, memory is DDR2 667mhz, and hd is 10k rated so the input of data, the retrieval of data, and the instruction set handling of the dual core all join in making the system responsive.

Since the majority of usage on that machine is either local or internet based - anything faster than 10mbps would not be recognized. The few times that I am accessing my server - the 10mbps does show it's head but to recable and punchdown is just bothersome to me at this point. IF I see a need to increase my access to my servers from that machine I will bite the bullet and run either 5e or 6 cat cable (right now it is not an issue though).