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TonyDi
01-21-2007, 08:30 AM
In an exercise to learn more about wireless networking, A buddy and I were testing a setup in my home. I was using a new Linksys wireless router. I was connecting to it wireless via my Mac and also a WinXP. The Mac has wireless capability built in. I installed a Westel wireless USB adapter on the XP machine.

The Mac connected wirelessly using DHCP. The WinXP machine wouldn't connect wirelessly using DHCP. I would connect if we entered a static IP in the Windows machine.

Because the XP machine connected wirelessly using a manually entered static IP, I think that it proved the USB wireless adapter and other IP settings were correct. Because the Mac connected wirelessly, I think that proved that the router was working properly.

Question is: Why would the WinXP machine connect with a static IP, but not with a dynamic IP setting?

- Tony

Tortanick
01-21-2007, 08:47 AM
You've pritty muched ruled out everything except the windows Dynamic IP Client. However networking is never as simple as it should be

TonyDi
01-21-2007, 08:48 AM
Yes - networking is not as easy as it should be. I've been running into embarrassing situations where I realized that I didn't have the networking expertise I should. That's why we were doing exercises in the office.
-td

Dan18960
01-21-2007, 11:04 AM
Your answer is USB.

By default XP can assign an ip address via booting on an internal PCI connection (the motherboard wifi connection is a pci connection) but with USB, the usb driver has to load, the usb manager has to load, and THEN the configuration for the usb device is ran. Since the USB is loading the configuration AFTER the networking configuration is ran (which is setup in the registry keys at bootup) the networking has to be unique to the usb device - thus static assignment.

I usually assign USB devices that customers feel necessary over PCI slot cards to the ip range of xxx.xxx.xxx.175 and up (except now with Verizon which I substitue the Linksys 100 - 150 to ActionTek 175 - 225 so I start at 230 for USB in those configurations).

And yes Networking is NOT the same as throwing a computer on a desk, connecting to a broadband router, and connecting to the internet.

Tony, what I would do is develop a range configuration and make it your model. I use xxx.xxx.xxx.1 - 10 for routers and wap's, xxx.xxx.xxx.25 - 49 as servers (whether peer to peer workstation / servers or full servers), xxx.xxx.xxx.50 - 99 for printers, and xxx.xxx.xxx.100 - 254 for workstations (and as I stated earlier Verizon is 175 - 224 BECAUSE if they get fios tv later Actiontek uses 100-150 for the tv devices).

Tortanick
01-21-2007, 11:34 AM
whats fios tv?

TonyDi
01-21-2007, 12:01 PM
I forgot to mention that the wireless USB device would connect (using DHCP) to another router that I tried (the FIOS ActionTek). So at that point, I thought it was an incompatibility with the Linksys router. So I'm not convinced that it's a USB networking problem, but I'm not ruling it out either.

What's your experience using the USB wireless manager that comes with the USB wireless adapters as opposed to letting Windows manage the device. You have the option of doing either.

also - thanks for the model range configuration idea and the note that Verizon FIOS uses 100-150. At lease one of my customers on FIOS just got the TV service with them.

Can a consumer network/router be configured so that each know machine has a static IP, but allow one or two DHCP devices to be added? This would allow the customer who gets a new wireless laptop to connect without having to get into the router or assign an address to the new machine themselves.

Dan18960
01-21-2007, 06:19 PM
I forgot to mention that the wireless USB device would connect (using DHCP) to another router that I tried (the FIOS ActionTek). So at that point, I thought it was an incompatibility with the Linksys router. So I'm not convinced that it's a USB networking problem, but I'm not ruling it out either.

What's your experience using the USB wireless manager that comes with the USB wireless adapters as opposed to letting Windows manage the device. You have the option of doing either.

also - thanks for the model range configuration idea and the note that Verizon FIOS uses 100-150. At lease one of my customers on FIOS just got the TV service with them.

Can a consumer network/router be configured so that each know machine has a static IP, but allow one or two DHCP devices to be added? This would allow the customer who gets a new wireless laptop to connect without having to get into the router or assign an address to the new machine themselves.

The actiontek authentication key is entered in the registry key and is high level encrpytion so it acts as a nice lock in for the ip address.

As for the consumer network - as long as you don't assign a static ip address in the DHCP dynamic range you won't have a conflict with the "new" machines.

Freehold Fred
01-21-2007, 11:19 PM
Sometimes, you DON'T have the liberty of doing either. WZC sometimes interferes with the devices wireless manager and vice versa.




What's your experience using the USB wireless manager that comes with the USB wireless adapters as opposed to letting Windows manage the device. You have the option of doing either.