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Dan18960
03-01-2007, 12:10 PM
Well, here is the lowdown on what is now a document for me to follow (temporarily - have MCSE coming by to double check my pigeon scratch attempt to setup my server -ALTHOUGH I doubt I did ANYTHING wrong :cool: )

Installed fresh Vista Ultimate version on workstation (new drive since old one did work this morning).

Let it go with the defaults this time - probably the way MOST machines will be configured anyway.

After Vista configured it's self for the "best" performance I did as Adam instructed and changed NetLogon from Manual to Automatic.

Checked Network settings - all LOCAL computers recognized and accessible so I have a working nic.

So now to connect to the domain - nope got the error that the computer was not setup to connect to a dc (domain controller). OK maybe need to change the settings from Private to Public. Nope same error.

Removed IPv6 - this has been suggested on several other forums. Nope still says it is not setup to join a dc.

OK now I am getting closer - go back into Network Properties (and it ain't Kansas anymore Toto, feels more like New Orleans). Assign a static ip address to the computer, subnet, gateway, and DNS server to the Windows 2003 Server. NOW we got lift off! Authentication completes, computer restarts, and I am asked to login to the server. Mapped drives all appear and internet access works!

Now the ONLY DNS server that is listed is the Windows 2003 Server which means that the forwarding zones are correctly resolving internet/intranet settings.

During this entire exercise I have been battling the UAC to continue. Remember I didn't want to change any settings from the "basic" install. Well UAC is in a REAL FUNNY place - Screen Saver Settings (what is THAT about?). I tried Rich's measure but the UAC kept banging me. Anyway, Select Change Power Settings, select Select User Accounts, remove the enabling check mark, and restart computer is required.

This handled the security settings AND the UAC pop-ups. Of course, MS does say you have made the computer unsecure but at least it isn't asking me to Continue every time I want to open a Properties!

Freehold Fred
03-01-2007, 06:31 PM
This looks like a Dan 'keeper' for my 'borrowed' references.

Dan18960
03-02-2007, 06:02 AM
Fred,

While my "GURU" (and we all have one to call on - even us TECH guys LOL) said that maybe the FIOS router (which is a BEAR to work with) maybe causing the issue with the DNS dc negotiation since both are handing off IP addresses.

He said we have to demote the DHCP on the server - but that would mean other issues. So this work-around of static ip assignments might be a "necessary" evil for areas where Comcast and Verizon are the internet manner of choice.

But hey - I AIN'T QUITIN' :bump2:

Dan18960
03-04-2007, 08:46 AM
Update:

Well, except for ONE setting (that HAD NOTHING to do with the problem) my 2003 Server was setup to par.

The one setting is actually a new understanding of 2003 and resolving dns names. Previously it was "standard" practice to forward the server to the dns servers of the isp. Now 2003 will resolve to the internet backbone servers automatically since they are listed (at least the CURRENT list is correct - maybe a couple years down the road I will have to revert again to checking the isp lists).

So it appears to be the FIOS router that Verizon supplies. Since the router is a BEAR to manipulate - I will just default to static assignment of ip addresses and authentication.

hetzer
03-05-2007, 09:24 AM
go back into Network Properties (and it ain't Kansas anymore Toto, feels more like New Orleans).

Dan,

I would love to hear the story on this one.

Hetzer

Dan18960
03-06-2007, 09:15 AM
Hetzer,

It is kind of hard to explain - you REALLY have to be in front of the Vista Computer. And if you read my start off posting - you will see that there are a lot of hoops in Vista to get to the simple things that are in XP.

The reference to New Orleans is that THIS operating system is more a disaster than a user friendly experience.

User Account Control, Windows Defender, Security Center, driver installations, hardware support, software support, and a whole litney of other issues.

IF you want to play with Vista, I suggest getting a machine that you don't care if you reformat the dickens out of because there is going to be some screwup that is going to have you reformatting over and over and over.

Smokey
03-07-2007, 01:53 AM
Update:
The one setting is actually a new understanding of 2003 and resolving dns names. Previously it was "standard" practice to forward the server to the dns servers of the isp. Now 2003 will resolve to the internet backbone servers automatically since they are listed (at least the CURRENT list is correct - maybe a couple years down the road I will have to revert again to checking the isp lists).


From Windows 2000 Server up to current from everything I have seen and worked on it was actually standard to set the DNS on a DC to itself as it was the DNS server. If there were other DNS servers on the local network configured with AD then you could use those but general practice is to configure it to itself. All of the servers and even clients in Windows have a file with the root servers so the DNS you have from FIOS is absolutely useless if you run your own DNS server inhouse. There isn't even a need to use those IP addresses anywhere.

Also in regards to the current list being updated, Microsoft puts out root server list updates periodically if they do change. And if I am not mistaken I saw one or two updates in the past 2 months from MS. They aren't classified as required updates but they are there.

Smokey
03-07-2007, 01:58 AM
Well, here is the lowdown on what is now a document for me to follow (temporarily - have MCSE coming by to double check my pigeon scratch attempt to setup my server -ALTHOUGH I doubt I did ANYTHING wrong :cool: )

Installed fresh Vista Ultimate version on workstation (new drive since old one did work this morning).

Let it go with the defaults this time - probably the way MOST machines will be configured anyway.

After Vista configured it's self for the "best" performance I did as Adam instructed and changed NetLogon from Manual to Automatic.

Checked Network settings - all LOCAL computers recognized and accessible so I have a working nic.

So now to connect to the domain - nope got the error that the computer was not setup to connect to a dc (domain controller). OK maybe need to change the settings from Private to Public. Nope same error.

Removed IPv6 - this has been suggested on several other forums. Nope still says it is not setup to join a dc.

OK now I am getting closer - go back into Network Properties (and it ain't Kansas anymore Toto, feels more like New Orleans). Assign a static ip address to the computer, subnet, gateway, and DNS server to the Windows 2003 Server. NOW we got lift off! Authentication completes, computer restarts, and I am asked to login to the server. Mapped drives all appear and internet access works!

Now the ONLY DNS server that is listed is the Windows 2003 Server which means that the forwarding zones are correctly resolving internet/intranet settings.

During this entire exercise I have been battling the UAC to continue. Remember I didn't want to change any settings from the "basic" install. Well UAC is in a REAL FUNNY place - Screen Saver Settings (what is THAT about?). I tried Rich's measure but the UAC kept banging me. Anyway, Select Change Power Settings, select Select User Accounts, remove the enabling check mark, and restart computer is required.

This handled the security settings AND the UAC pop-ups. Of course, MS does say you have made the computer unsecure but at least it isn't asking me to Continue every time I want to open a Properties!

The oddest thing about this whole thing is after my Ultimate install here on my test bed and finally getting a NIC that actually works (long story) I enabled the netlogon service and off I went. Joined right to my 2003 domain (non R2). I haven't imaged it yet, demoted, disabled netlogon and tried again, however given that windows still relies on it, I am not sure how that will work. I'll have to test it.

In regards to IPv6, I didn't change a thing. The test machine is actually running 4 and 6 together as it should. v4 is communicating with all of my boxes but my freebsd server. The freebsd server is running IPv6 for testing purposes and this is communicating fine with it.