PDA

View Full Version : You know those little extra ethernet and cable jacks on surge protectors?



Freehold Fred
07-17-2007, 11:03 PM
USE THEM!

I just witnessed the results of a fire/surge that wiped out a cable modem, router, hardware firewall, monitor on one computer and CPU on another. It also killed some phone/fax lines and I think a fax machine. Have you every seen a fried RJ45?

Phelyx
07-17-2007, 11:28 PM
No, please submit photos.

Freehold Fred
07-18-2007, 12:54 AM
Good idea. My digital camera is going with me tomorrow...


No, please submit photos.

PeteF
07-18-2007, 04:29 AM
USE THEM!

I agree 100%!
I'll also add, if you have very long runs (over 50 feet) of LAN cables
add an ethernet surge supressor at the end near your router or modem.
For extremely long runs add a surge supressor at the computer end too.

Tripplite Surge Suppressor...
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=861249&Sku=T105-5268&SRCCODE=PRICEGRABBER&CMP=OTC-PRICEGRABBER


---pete---

compusimple
07-18-2007, 07:37 AM
never saw it on ethernet cable but have seen it on rj11 connector on phone cable and result was a fried modem.

elliott

Guest117
07-18-2007, 07:59 AM
Don't need pic. Just get protector with RJ Style Surge Protection. The Series of surge protectors for RJ45 and RJ11 interfaces.
While you're at it, if you live in lightning prone areas, like me....Florida,
use surge protectors on all electronic equipment like TV's, stereo's, radio's,
any high dollar device that plugs into A/C outlets.
I have seen hits around here that blew out (smoked) all a/c outlets in
a whole house. That was extreme but true.
Decent surge protectors are not that expensive. Less than replacing burned
out items.
Good luck. and be careful.http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d53/NickGrana/Storm-06-june.gif

Seth
07-18-2007, 08:52 AM
How can a surge protector safe guard against lightening?

Isn't that like trying to stop a bullet with a piece of cardboard?

Terry Hanushek
07-18-2007, 08:56 AM
Surge protectors for power, ethernet and phone lines are good protection from moderate fluctuations in power. However, if you get a lightning strike like Nick's shows above you can expect to be taking pictures like Fred. The best protection during a severe electrical storm is to disconnect from the outside lines.

Terry

Guest117
07-18-2007, 09:05 AM
Oh, I admit a direct hit to your incoming line by a bolt of lightning won't
help you, but it's the strikes that hit close and cause the power surges
to your equipment that you want protection from.
I'm not the most prolific writer and take a lot for granted with some of my
statements.
That's where some of you guys come in to take up the slack.:D
Surge protection on all your lines will help in the long run, rest assured.:)

Seth
07-18-2007, 09:11 AM
Ok, thanks guys.

What about the possibility of really good protection right at the panel?

PeteF
07-19-2007, 04:45 AM
The best automatic protection you can get to guard against Lightning is
the Intelligent Line Disconnect by Rabun Labs. I've had this type of device
on my phone lines since the early 1990s. The model I have is no longer
made but basically it detects when there is a lightning storm close by and
automaticaly disconnects your computer from the phone or cable lines for
about 10 minutes. The cycle repeats until the storm is out of the area.
The device below appears to be an automatic disconnect device but I
don't think it has lightning detection as mine does.

Intelligent Line Disconnect by Rabun Labs
http://www.rabunlabs.com/intelligent/Default.htm

I paid about $300 for mine around 1992 and it's much more complex
than this device above with bar-LED meter showing lightning activity,
and all sorts of controls on the front panel.

Unfortunately, the Rabun Labs website does not give enough details
about how their fantastic device operates, how much it costs or
where t buy one. They are another example of great company with
a great product and great developement team but they lack the
ability to market their products effectively. To see what I mean,
look at their website and you will see they don't even show you
the back panel of the device.

Therefore, if you want to learn more about it or obtain one you have
to make an effort to contact them directly. I highly recommend it.
It's such a well kept secret product.

---pete---

PeteF
07-19-2007, 05:59 AM
Ok, thanks guys.

What about the possibility of really good protection right at the panel?

An electrician can install a "whole house" surge supressor directly on
the main panel. My father lives in Florida, the lightning state, and
he had one installed for about 2 or 3 hundred dollars.

---pete---

Phelyx
07-19-2007, 11:41 AM
This post got me thinking about my "electron insurgent" security via Ethernet. If the surge comes through coaxial it has to go through the modem, to router one, then through 50 foot of cable to router 2a or 2b then another 8 foot cable then to one of my PCs, if it comes through electrical, then my power supply would more likely go out rather than going through Ethernet. I still want pictures cause logic would say the failure when through the Power Supply as normal.

Guest117
07-19-2007, 01:03 PM
Here's the deal. If you have all electronic devices plugged into surge protectors,
and a thunder/electrical storm is near, unplug all the surge protectors.
If I had to do that where I live, I may as well only plug something in
when I want to use it.:)